Monday, October 13, 2008

Still Breathin' . . .

The writer within is stirring. Yesterday she started a short story and wrote half of it. She wants the fun of it back; she wants the joy of creation back; but she doesn't want to force anything or talk it to death. She's stirring.

Book of the Semi-Month Club will appear on 10/15 as scheduled, although it will be a bit out of the box since it will reflect what I've been reading in the last couple of weeks. Till then, thanks for stopping by . . .

8 comments:

Tabitha said...

Glad to hear you're still up and about. And writing, even. :) Will look forward to the next Book of the Month. :)

Marcia said...

Yeah, I had to "quit" and make it not a "have to." And I've been jotting more ideas for my story today. :)

Kim Kasch said...

I just finished The Shack and went to hear William P. Young talk about his journey. It was, like Arte Johnson used to say on Laugh-in, "Very Interesting."

I'll have a post about it on 10/15.

Thanks for popping by.

Marcia said...

I'm 35th out of 44 on the hold list for The Shack at my library, so it'll be a while for me. I'll be interested to hear your opinion. :)

Anne Spollen said...

Smart to not make writing a have to - I always think that shows in the writing.

Marcia said...

Sometimes "have to" translates into "words, words, I must produce words" and that means I produce writing that's too slow-paced. It doesn't push the story forward enough; it just gets words down. That's why I tend not to use word-count measures for myself when I write. I'd rather deal with time periods, and be honest about whether I spent a productive two hours or piddled away two hours.

Brenda said...

I think the reason most people hate their "jobs" is because they "have" to go to work...with writing, I enjoy it most because I "want" to do it...

Hope the writing keeps flowing for you...

Marcia said...

I agree there's something about compulsory work that brings out the "I don't want to" in all of us. Which is why many writers should think again before saying they want to go full time, as in rely on writing for their daily bread. Or write series, where the deadlines fly thick and fast and you're doing a 9-5er every day if not more. I'm grateful for my series; they made this slow writer more productive and taught me that I CAN plot and write faster. But finding out that your lifelong dream can be just another grind is a special kind of disillusionment.